Sophie Lanzkron, MD, MHS | oneSCDvoice
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healthcare providers

Sophie Miriam Lanzkron, MD

Healthcare Provider
Director of Sickle Cell Center for Adults
The Johns Hopkins Hospital
1800 Orleans St.
Sheikh Zayed Tower
Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Dr. Sophie Lanzkron is an associate professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Her areas of clinical expertise include hematology and sickle cell disease. Dr. Lanzkron is director of the Sickle Cell Center for Adults at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Lanzkron received her undergraduate degree in biology from Brandeis University. She earned her M.D. from Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She completed her residency at the University of Maryland Medical Center and performed her fellowship in hematology at Johns Hopkins. She joined the faculty of Johns Hopkins in 2000.

Dr. Lanzkron’s major clinical research involves the study of sickle cell disease. Her primary research interest is to understand the barriers to care for adults with sickle cell disease. In 1998, the FDA approved the use of hydroxyurea to treat patients with sickle cell disease. This approval was based on a large clinical trial centered at Johns Hopkins. The use of hydroxyurea was predicted to decrease hospitalizations and the costs of care for those with sickle cell disease. Dr. Lanzkron’s research has shown that despite the approval of hydroxyurea, the costs of caring for patients with sickle cell disease have increased significantly over the last seven years. Research is ongoing to identify the factors that limit access to care for this population.


Representative Publications:

Efficacy and safety of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in persons with sickle cell disease

Multiple Levels of Suffering: Discrimination in Health-Care Settings is Associated With Enhanced Laboratory Pain Sensitivity in Sickle Cell Disease

Chronic Opioid Therapy and Central Sensitization in Sickle Cell Disease

The Association of Clinician Characteristics with their Attitudes Toward Patients with Sickle Cell Disease: Secondary Analyses of a Randomized Controlled Trial

Perceived discrimination in health care is associated with a greater burden of pain in sickle cell disease

Venous thromboembolism in adults with sickle cell disease: a serious and under-recognized complication

Dental infections increase the likelihood of hospital admissions among adult patients with sickle cell disease

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