• Join Today!

Become a member and connect with:

  • An Active Online Community
  • Articles and Advice on SCD
  • Help Understanding Clinical Trials
patient education

Sickle Retinopathy

key information

source: Johns Hopkins Medicine

year: N/A

summary/abstract:

Sickle cell disease is caused by a small or point mutation in the hemoglobin molecule that is found in red blood cells (RBCs). Hemoglobin and the RBCs are important for carrying oxygen throughout the body in blood vessels. Because of the mutation, the hemoglobin makes polymers in the RBCs, which causes them to become rigid and abnormally shaped. Often RBCs appear sickle-shaped, giving the disease its name. These sickle RBCs (sRBCs) get stuck in blood vessels in retina and in many other organ systems, causing the tissue to become ischemic.

Dr. Lutty’s lab has developed a rat animal model for the occlusions caused by sRBCs in which human donor’s sRBCs are labeled with a fluorescent dye and injected into the blood of a rat. The number of cells that get stuck in retina can be counted at the end of the experiment, allowing therapies to prevent them from getting stuck to be evaluated.

read more

To improve your experience on this site, we use cookies. This includes cookies essential for the basic functioning of our website, cookies for analytics purposes, and cookies enabling us to personalize site content. By clicking on 'Accept' or any content on this site, you agree that cookies can be placed. You may adjust your browser's cookie settings to suit your preferences. More information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close