Inhaled nitric oxide for acute chest syndrome in adult sickle cell patients: a randomized controlled study | oneSCDvoice
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scientific articles

Inhaled nitric oxide for acute chest syndrome in adult sickle cell patients: a randomized controlled study

key information

source: Intensive Care Medicine

year: 2015

authors: Maitre B, Djibre M, Katsahian S, Habibi A, Stankovic Stojanovic K, Khellaf M, Bourgeon I, Lionnet F, Charles-Nelson A, Brochard L, Lemaire F, Galacteros F, Brun-Buisson C, Fartoukh M, Mekontso Dessap A

summary/abstract:

PURPOSE:
Previous clinical trials suggested that inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) could have beneficial effects in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients with acute chest syndrome (ACS).
METHODS:
To determine whether iNO reduces treatment failure rate in adult patients with ACS, we conducted a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. iNO (80 ppm, N = 50) gas or inhaled nitrogen placebo (N = 50) was delivered for 3 days. The primary end point was the number of patients with treatment failure at day 3, defined as any one of the following: (1) death from any cause, (2) need for endotracheal intubation, (3) decrease of PaO2/FiO2 ≥ 15 mmHg between days 1 and 3, (4) augmented therapy defined as new transfusion or phlebotomy.
RESULTS:
The two groups did not differ in age, gender, genotype, or baseline characteristics and biological parameters. iNO was well tolerated, although a transient decrease in nitric oxide concentration was mandated in one patient. There was no significant difference in the primary end point between the iNO and placebo groups [23 (46 %) and 29 (58 %); odds ratio (OR), 0.8; 95 % CI, 0.54-1.16; p = 0.23]. A post hoc analysis of the 45 patients with hypoxemia showed that those in the iNO group were less likely to experience treatment failure at day 3 [7 (33.3 %) vs 18 (72 %); OR = 0.19; 95 % CI, 0.06-0.68; p = 0.009].
CONCLUSIONS:
iNO did not reduce the rate of treatment failure in adult SCD patients with mild to moderate ACS. Future trials should target more severely ill ACS patients with hypoxemia.

organisation: AP-HP, Hôpitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor; UPEC, Créteil; Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal de Créteil; CHU Henri Mondor; Sorbonne Universités UPMC, Paris 06; St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto; Groupe Henri-Mondor, Créteil

DOI: 10.1007/s00134-015-4060-2

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