Adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in pregnant women with sickle cell disease: systematic review and meta-analysis | oneSCDvoice
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scientific articles

Adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in pregnant women with sickle cell disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

key information

source: Blood

year: 2015

authors: Oteng-Ntim E, Meeks D, Seed PT, Webster L, Howard J, Doyle P, Chappell LC

summary/abstract:

A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies were conducted to quantify the association between sickle cell disease in pregnancy and adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes. Data sources (Medline, Embase, Maternity and Infant care, Cochrane, Web of Science, Popline) were searched for publications to June 2014. Eligibility criteria included observational studies reporting maternal and perinatal health outcomes in pregnant women with sickle cell disease against a comparative group of pregnant women without sickle cell disease. Twenty-one studies (including 26,349 women with sickle cell disease; 26,151,746 women without sickle cell disease) were eligible for inclusion. Pregnancies in women with HbSS genotype, compared with women without sickle cell disease, were at increased risk of maternal mortality (relative risk [RR], 5.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.94-18.44), preeclampsia (RR, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.75-3.39), stillbirth (RR, 3.94; 95% CI, 2.60-5.96), preterm delivery (RR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.47-3.31), and small for gestational age infants (RR, 3.72; 95% CI, 2.32-5.98). Meta-regression demonstrated that genotype (HbSS vs HbSC), low gross national income, and high study quality were associated with increased RRs. Despite advances in the management of sickle cell disease, obstetrics, and neonatal medicine, pregnancies complicated by the disease remain associated with increased risk of adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes.

organisation: King's College London; Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

DOI: 10.1182/blood-2014-11-607317

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