Pain self-management interventions that are effective and practical in rural settings: results from a systematic literature review | oneSCDvoice
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Pain self-management interventions that are effective and practical in rural settings: results from a systematic literature review

key information

source: The Journal of Pain

year: 2014

authors: P. Joshi, L. Ochs, K. Ito, A. Adcock, V. Springmann, V. Montori, J. Devlin, E. Huang, E. Bilsky, N. Col

summary/abstract:

Several chronic disease self-management interventions have been implemented, but little is known about the effectiveness and feasibility of the growing number of chronic pain self-management programs. These programs encompass a wide-range of approaches, from simple self-help books to intensive counseling. We sought to identify effective pain-self management interventions that target common chronic pain syndromes and that are practical to implement in rural settings. We systematically searched Pub-Med and Embase databases from 1975- 2013 for trials evaluating the effectiveness of chronic pain self-management interventions in adults. Trials had to include a control group. Because our focus was on common chronic pain syndromes, we excluded orofacial, cancer or pregnancy-related pain; because we sought interventions that could be easily implemented, we excluded interventions that required >3 onsite visits, specialty devices, medications, or an active provider for each session. Two reviewers independently screened abstracts and abstracted data. The initial search yielded 560 articles whose abstracts were reviewed, of which 77 articles were selected for full-text review and 8 met all inclusion criteria. These 8 studies involved a total of 1,072 patients (in intervention groups) whose mean age was 56 years. Self-management interventions included educational booklets (6), telephone calls (4), web-based tools (2), and group classes (1); two studies included follow-up calls and/or tailored messages. All studies reported positive effects: 7 on pain, 4 on quality of life, and 4 on functional status. Results could not be combined for meta-analysis due to heterogeneity of outcome measures. Several practical approaches to pain self-management have been developed that appear both feasible and effective. More work is needed to identify which self-management approaches work best for which patients.

organisation: University of New England, Portland, ME

DOI: 10.1016/j.jpain.2014.01.049

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