Athlete and Coach Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions of Sickle Cell Trait and National Collegiate Athletic Association Mandated Testing: Recommendations for Intervention | oneSCDvoice
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reference materials

Athlete and Coach Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions of Sickle Cell Trait and National Collegiate Athletic Association Mandated Testing: Recommendations for Intervention

key information

source: Georgia Southern University

year: 2010

authors: Raymona Holloway Lawrence

summary/abstract:

Author’s abstract: Individuals with Sickle Cell Trait have died suddenly after extreme exertion during military training, athletic practice or games (Kerle & Nishimura, 1996; Harrelson, Fincher & Robinson, 1995; Howe & Bowden, 2007). One of those deaths, Dale Lloyd, a football player at Rice University, prompted a change in the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s (NCAA) Sports Medicine Handbook Guideline 3c: The Student Athlete with Sickle Cell Trait. Effective August 2010, the NCAA Division I Proposal No. 2009-75-B mandated sickle cell trait testing in all Division I athletes unless documented results of a prior test are provided to the institution or the student-athlete declines the test and signs a written release. It is well-documented that in the United States, Sickle Cell Disease/Sickle Cell Trait primarily affects African Americans more than any other race or ethnicity (NIH, 2008). Sickle cell screening programs have been scrutinized since the 1970s (Pemberton & Wailoo, 2006) because of insensitivity to race. The recent change in NCAA Guideline 3c has been scrutinized partially for the same reason. The purpose of this mixed methods study was threefold.

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